Ovarian Cancer Prevention

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Ovarian Cancer Prevention

Dr. Constance Alfano-Weigand,
Jupiter, Florida
September 22nd 2012

Dear Ann Romney,

During the Democratic Convention, Sandra Fluke, Georgetown University’s law graduate and Women’s Rights Activist spoke at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C. Wednesday night, September 5, 2012                                                              

Ms. Fluke made some startling statements regarding the medical use of Sonograms. These statements are very disturbing, misleading and could severely threaten women’s lives, by convincing women not to have certain tests.

These quotes are taken directly from her speech:

1.       “…Many women are shut out and silenced…”
I went to medical school in the 60’s. Not one single problem ever. In fact, I felt being a woman was advantageous!
2.       “…An America in which States humiliate women by forcing us to endure invasive ultrasounds we don’t want and our doctors say we don’t need…”
This is a very dangerous statement.
3.      “…in which no one can deny us affordable access to the cancer screenings that could save our lives…”
This statement contradicts the previous statement.

 

Attached is a copy of the letter I’m sending to Ms. Fluke in order to get her to dispel the ludicrous accusation of the so-called, “War on Women”.

Your own health experiences are testimony to your credibility. You are the ideal messenger.

Please help get this message to all women.

I’m very grateful, and I wish you the very best of health for a very long time!

Sincerely,

Constance Alfano-Weigand, MD,CCN,ND

www.DoctorAlfano.com

www.ovariancancerprevention.com (under construction)

Dr. Constance Alfano-Weigand

Jupiter, Florida

September 22nd 2012

 

Dear Ms. Fluke,

I’m always very happy to see talented women joining the respected professions and I wish you every success and a brilliant legal career.

As a physician of almost 30 years with a large female practice, I was surprised to hear your position on medical sonograms, invasive sonograms, and that the doctors don’t want them either. This is extremely disturbing and a severe threat to women’s health. You said:

1. “…Many women are shut out and silenced…” I went to medical school in the 60’s. Not one single problem ever. In fact, I felt being a woman was advantageous!

2. “…An America in which States humiliate women by forcing us to endure invasive ultrasounds we don’t want and our doctors say we don’t need…” This is a very dangerous, misleading statement.

3. “…in which no one can deny us affordable access to the cancer screenings that could save our lives…” This statement contradicts the previous statement.

Ovarian Cancer is very difficult to diagnose.

Symptoms are varied. Unfortunately, sometimes the first symptom indicates the cancer has spread.

My own niece was treated for GERD and “indigestion” for 3 years until she experienced severe abdominal pain. She was rushed to the local ER where a cantaloupe size cancer was found.

Another one of my patients was on a weight loss regimen for about a year until she experienced symptoms localized to the ovaries. By the time she came to me the cancer had spread to the abdomen. By this time we had become close friends.

I cannot adequately express the frustration, the sorrow, and yes the anger, and the desperation I felt to save her life.

I managed to keep her alive for almost 4 years. I even got in trouble with the Medical Board for using alternative methods unknown to the FDA.

I lost the battle.

To this day, many years later, the vision of her 3 children sitting in my office is fixed in my brain.

An overwhelming helplessness was with me for a long time until I decided to go after this enemy with a vengeance.

I created a protocol that would prevent this from ever happening again.

Every female in my practice started with a baseline sonogram of both ovaries included with the basic History and Physical. This was repeated every 3 years. I was determined to find a possible cancer in the early stages where it could be removed and trashed.

Now I was in charge and my patient was safe.

Isn’t this what a doctor should do?

Ms. Fluke, it’s the invention of the Sonogram that you mentioned that enables us to do that.

The “invasive sonogram” is another life saver. The visibility is far greater and any lesion is seen with specificity. Diagnosis is much more accurate.

I can’t imagine any doctor that would oppose that.

Gilda Radner lost her life at a young age to Ovarian Cancer. Ella Grasso, the governor of Connecticut was a menopausal female and she also became a victim. Age is not a barrier. We are all susceptible!

So my dear Ms. Fluke, please retract these statements.  Encourage all women to follow my protocol, to have sonograms, mammograms, colonoscopies and all those wonderful medical tools we have, to get the cancer before it gets us.

Today more doctors are aware of the difficulty in detecting ovarian cancer. The slightest suspicion should have the doctor perform a complete pelvic exam, a transvaginal or pelvic ultrasound, and a CA-125 blood test. Used individually, these tests are not definitive; they are most effective when used in combination with each other. Doctors may also use a CT scan or PET scan as part of the diagnostic process. As time and progress move on in a medical society where doctors are free to use their skills aggressively, our diagnostic abilities will improve and hopefully this deadly disease will be eradicated.

The only definitive way to determine if a patient has ovarian cancer is through surgery and biopsy but a high index of suspicion and preliminary testing must be and should be done on all patients.

Your last quote:

“…in which no one can deny us affordable access to the cancer screenings that could save our lives; “

On this, we are in complete agreement.

Again, I urge you to encourage all women to follow my protocol, to have sonograms, mammograms, colonoscopies and use all those wonderful medical and diagnostic tools we have, to get the cancer before it gets us.

Sincerely,

Constance Alfano-Weigand, MD,CCN,ND

 

References:

This article *http://www.ovariancancer.org/about-ovarian-cancer/statistics/ describes the statistics and Ovarian Cancer.

Researchers make headway in ovarian cancer detection, reports Harvard Women’s Health Watch

April 2010

“When it comes to ovarian cancer, silence can be deadly. About three-quarters of ovarian cancers are diagnosed after the cancer has quietly spread to other parts of the body, making treatment difficult. Researchers are slowly making headway in developing tests to identify ovarian cancer in its earlier, treatable stages, reports the April 2010 issue of Harvard Women’s Health Watch.

Detecting ovarian cancer early is tricky for many reasons. The ovaries are difficult to feel during a pelvic exam, making early-stage tumors hard to spot on a routine exam. Ovarian cancer doesn’t start with any known precancerous lesion. And while ovarian cancer may produce telltale chemicals, such as cancer antigen 125 (CA-125), no biomarker specific to ovarian cancer has yet been identified. Taking ultrasound images of the ovaries via the vagina could potentially spot early ovarian tumors, but most ovarian tumors aren’t cancerous, and surgery is the only way to tell if a suspicious growth is cancerous or benign. Two trials are under way to find out if screening with ultrasound plus CA-125 testing improves survival, but the final results aren’t expected for several years.

 

By | 2012-11-05T22:41:35+00:00 October 7th, 2012|Ask The Doctor|0 Comments

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